Rod Marsh, Australia’s stalwart wicketkeeper, departs after a great inning.

Rod Marsh, an Australian cricket legend and wicketkeeper who developed a successful wicket-taking partnership with pace bowler Dennis Lillee, died a week after having a heart attack while attending a fundraising event in Queensland. He was 74 years old at the time.

Marsh, who played 96 test matches for Australia between 1970 and 1984, died in an Adelaide hospital on Friday, according to the Sport Australia Hall of Fame.

Marsh has a test record of 355 wicketkeeper dismissals, including 95 off Lillee’s bowling. Before retiring from first-class cricket in February 1984, he also played 92 one-day internationals for Australia.

He was the first Australian wicketkeeper to make a century in test cricket, and he had three by the end of his career.

Marsh is Australia’s all-time dismissal leader, with 416 dismissals to Adam Gilchrist’s 416 and Ian Healy’s 395.

Marsh was regarded as a “absolute icon” of the sport by Australia Test legend Mark Waugh.

“You wouldn’t meet a more honest, down to earth, kind-hearted person,” Waugh continued. “I had the pleasure of working with Rod for a number of years as a selector.”

David Hussey, a former Australia one-day international, paid tribute to Rod on Twitter, writing: “Rod will be missed.”

“‘Cricket is a basic game made complicated,’ he once said, and that still rings true for me.”

  • Career Highlights

From 1970 through 1984, the cricketer set a global record with 355 dismissals in 96 Test appearances.

Marsh is Australia’s all-time dismissal leader with 416 dismissals, trailing only Adam Gilchrist (416) and Ian Healy (395).

In 1972-73, Marsh became the first Australian wicketkeeper to record a Test century, and he went on to earn two more hundreds and 16 half centuries for his country before being inducted into Cricket Australia’s Hall of Fame in 2005.

The Australian and fast bowler Dennis Lillee created an outstanding connection, with the pair being regarded as one of the best bowler-wicketkeeper combinations of all time, claiming 95 dismissals, which is still a Test cricket world record to this day.

Marsh’s reluctance to join embroiled in Australia’s underarm bowling controversy in a one-day international against New Zealand in 1981 was another remarkable moment in his career.

After team captain Gregg Chappell ordered his brother Trevor to bowl an underarm on the penultimate ball to ensure their opponents couldn’t strike a six to draw the match, he was famously seen shaking his head behind the crease.

Marsh played in the first ODI at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on January 5, 1971, and retired from top-level cricket in February 1984 following his 92nd ODI against the West Indies. He was also a part of World Series Cricket in the late 1970s, which polarised international cricket before transforming the sport for professional players and fans.

He was the first Australian wicketkeeper to achieve a century in a Test match against Pakistan in Adelaide in 1972, and he went on to score three more in his career. He later served as the founding head of the International Cricket Council’s world coaching academy in Dubai, as well as leading national cricket academies in Australia and England.

He was named as Australia’s chairman of selectors in 2014 and served in that capacity for two years.

Rod Marsh, an Australian cricket legend and wicketkeeper who developed a successful wicket-taking partnership with pace bowler Dennis Lillee, died a week after having a heart attack while attending a fundraising event in Queensland. He was 74 years old at the time.

Marsh, who played 96 test matches for Australia between 1970 and 1984, died in an Adelaide hospital on Friday, according to the Sport Australia Hall of Fame.

Marsh has a test record of 355 wicketkeeper dismissals, including 95 off Lillee’s bowling. Before retiring from first-class cricket in February 1984, he also played 92 one-day internationals for Australia.

He was the first Australian wicketkeeper to make a century in test cricket, and he had three by the end of his career.

Marsh is Australia’s all-time dismissal leader, with 416 dismissals to Adam Gilchrist’s 416 and Ian Healy’s 395.

Marsh was regarded as an “absolute icon” of the sport by Australia Test legend Mark Waugh.

“You wouldn’t meet a more honest, down to earth, kind-hearted person,” Waugh continued. “I had the pleasure of working with Rod for a number of years as a selector.”

David Hussey, a former Australia one-day international, paid tribute to Rod on Twitter, writing: “Rod will be missed.”

“‘Cricket is a basic game made complicated,’ he once said, and that still rings true for me.”

  • Career Highlights

From 1970 through 1984, the cricketer set a global record with 355 dismissals in 96 Test appearances.

Marsh is Australia’s all-time dismissal leader with 416 dismissals, trailing only Adam Gilchrist (416) and Ian Healy (395).

In 1972-73, Marsh became the first Australian wicketkeeper to record a Test century, and he went on to earn two more hundreds and 16 half-centuries for his country before being inducted into Cricket Australia’s Hall of Fame in 2005.

The Australian and fast bowler Dennis Lillee created an outstanding connection, with the pair being regarded as one of the best bowler-wicketkeeper combinations of all time, claiming 95 dismissals, which is still a Test cricket world record to this day.

Marsh’s reluctance to join embroiled in Australia’s underarm bowling controversy in a one-day international against New Zealand in 1981 was another remarkable moment in his career.

After team captain Gregg Chappell ordered his brother Trevor to bowl an underarm on the penultimate ball to ensure their opponents couldn’t strike a six to draw the match, he was famously seen shaking his head behind the crease.

Marsh played in the first ODI at the Melbourne Cricket Ground on January 5, 1971, and retired from top-level cricket in February 1984 following his 92nd ODI against the West Indies. He was also a part of World Series Cricket in the late 1970s, which polarised international cricket before transforming the sport for professional players and fans.

He was the first Australian wicketkeeper to achieve a century in a Test match against Pakistan in Adelaide in 1972, and he went on to score three more in his career. He later served as the founding head of the International Cricket Council’s world coaching academy in Dubai, as well as leading national cricket academies in Australia and England.

He was named as Australia’s chairman of selectors in 2014 and served in that capacity for two years.

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